Violence in dating


About a third of the girls said they were the sole perpetrators, and 13 percent reported that they were the sole victims. Yonas, "The Meaning of Dating Violence in the Lives of Middle School Adolescents: A Report of a Focus Group Study," 4 (1998): 180-194. Almost half of the boys in physically aggressive relationships reported mutual aggression, nearly half reported they were the sole victim, and 6 percent reported that they were the sole perpetrator.[6]These findings are generally consistent with another study that looked at more than 1,200 Long Island, N. [note 27] Fredland, "The Meaning of Dating Violence." [note 28] Larson, R. They contend that men in patriarchal societies use violence to exert and maintain power and control over women.[13] These experts also maintain that "act" scales do not accurately reflect the nature of violence in intimate relationships because they do not consider the degree of injury inflicted, coercive and controlling behaviors, the fear induced, or the context in which the acts occurred.[14] Studies using "act" scales, they contend, lack information on power and control and emphasize the more common and relatively minor forms of aggression rather than more severe, relatively rare forms of violence in dating and intimate partner relationships.[15] Instead, supporters of this perspective use data on injuries and in-depth interviews with victims and perpetrators.[16]We believe, however, that applying either of these adult perspectives to adolescents is problematic. Although both views of adult intimate partner violence can help inform our understanding of teen dating violence, it is important to consider how adolescent romantic relationships differ from adult romantic relationships in several key areas. These numbers were reversed for the boys: 5 percent said they were the sole perpetrator; 27 percent the sole victim. In a third study, teen couples were videotaped while performing a problem-solving task. One difference between adolescent and adult relationships is the absence of elements traditionally associated with greater male power in adult relationships.[17] Adolescent girls are not typically dependent on romantic partners for financial stability, and they are less likely to have children to provide for and protect. Huebner, "Severe Dating Violence and Quality of Life Among South Carolina High School Students," 19 (2000): 220-227. The study of seventh, ninth and 11th graders in Toledo, for example, found that a majority of the boys and girls who were interviewed said they had a relatively "equal say" in their romantic relationships. [note 4] National victimization prevalence estimates from a study of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years showed 0.6 percent for boys and 2.7 percent for girls.





Violence in dating comments


  • Recognizing Dating Violence Violence Prevention Works profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    What is Dating Violence? Dating violence is a pattern of behaviors used to exert power or control over a dating partner. Dating violence includes any behavior by a.…
  • Teen Dating Violence A Closer Look at Adolescent Romantic. profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    Most teenagers do not experience physical aggression when they date. However, for one in 10 teens, abuse is a very real part of dating relationships.…
  • Dating violence and abuse womenshealth.gov profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    Dating violence is physical, sexual, emotional, or verbal abuse from a romantic or sexual partner. It happens to women of all races and ethnicities.…
  • Violence in Dating Relationships dhs profil de paulette60

    paulette60

    Loving and nurturing relationships are important to us all. A healthy relationship encourages outside interests and friendships. It provides support and affection.…